Game 119: NYY vs. NYM — #SubwaySeries victory tour continues in Queens

The Subway Series continued in Queens, before yet another sold-out crowd, their 5th one in 6 games (and the 6th one came within a few hundred seats of being another sell-out). And they decided to make things interesting before a New York hometown crowd.

Like the other newer starter yesterday, Jaime Garcia had a pretty good outing tonight. He threw 91 pitches into the 6th inning and gave up 5 hits, 3 walks, and 3 runs, striking out just 3 Mets batters. In the 1st, a lead-off double moved to 3rd on a ground out and then scored on a sacrifice fly to give the Mets a small early lead. Garcia held off the Mets for a time, later giving up a 2-out solo home run in the 5th. And in the 6th, with 2 runners on and just 1 out, Garcia’s night came to a close (with both those runners on his account).

Tommy Kahnle unfortunately promptly gave up a sacrifice fly that scored the lead runner (charged to Garcia), but then closed out the inning with a fly out, handing the game to Adam Warren. Warren sailed through 2 innings, adding 3 strikeouts of his own, in a rather strong showing for the now veteran bullpen staple. David Robertson’s 9th inning was everything we expect from tonight’s closer (see below), sewing up the game with 2 more strikeouts and his 14th save on the season.

Meanwhile, the Yankees played a bit of “tag” with the Mets for a good portion of the game. After the Mets scored in the 1st, the Yankees tied up the game in the 2nd when Chase Headley worked a walk, moved to 2nd on a wild pitch, then to 3rd on a passed ball, and scored on Garrett Cooper’s ground out. Aaron Judge’s monster home run (all 457 feet into the upper deck in left field) led-off the 4th to put the Yankees in the lead.

Then the Mets caught up with the Yankees and tied up the game, so the Yankees forged ahead in the 6th, loading up the bases with a single and 2 walks. After the Mets’ starter left the game, Headley’s sacrifice fly scored lead-runner Judge to put the Yankees back on top.

When the game got tied up again in the bottom of the 6th, the Yankees weren’t about to just sit on their laurels. So in the 7th, Torreyes led-off with a double, moved to 3rd on a sacrifice bunt, and then watched as the bases were loaded with Ellsbury and Hicks’ walks. After 1 out, Didi Gregorius hit a solid double into the corner of right field that scored 2 runs to give the Yankees the lead their strong bullpen wasn’t about to surrender.

Final score: 5-3 Yankees

Aroldis Chapman was unavailable to pitch today due to some tightness he felt in his hamstring during yesterday’s game. He’s hoping to avoid the disabled list, and the Yankees still consider him their primary closer. But with the likes of Betances and Robertson (who closed out the game tonight), the Yankees are not hurting for back-end of their bullpen.

In fact, their bullpen might be one of the strongest points of this season. Even when other parts weren’t clicking (like starting pitching or a lagging offense), the bullpen was able to often save the game from getting out of hand. I would even wager to say that the bullpen may be the primary reason the Yankees are still in contention for the postseason. Of course, it’s one of the few parts of the team that rarely gets a lot of attention, but those relievers are something else to watch, a crucial part of the team’s success story.

It’s so easy to overlook the players who don’t make the big splashy plays. Isn’t it like life though? It’s the little things, the under-the-radar moments, the ones that won’t make the headlines that matter the most. The so-called “small stuff” matters because it’s in that “small stuff” that we find consistency of character, the foundation for how to handle life’s “big stuff”, the moments that catch all the glory (or shame, as the case may be).

And in a team like the Yankees, we see things like persistence and perseverance and possibilities in the small stuff — the consistency of the middle relievers like Warren or Green, the strong but quiet defense of guys like Torreyes or Romine, or the flexibility and rally of Headley. So it’s no wonder the same stuff is then reflect in the big stuff — like a Judge or Sanchez homer, Gardner’s highlight reel outfield plays, or Chapman’s 103mph fastball.

Go Yankees!

Game 116: BOS vs. NYY — Blown save & extra inning disappointment

It’s funny, actually. Going into the later innings, despite the game being tied, all the “people that know” were giving the Yankees a 60-70% chance of winning the game. And then everything went so terribly wrong.

Jordan Montgomery certainly showed no ill effects from his foul ball connection yesterday, having a pretty good outing in tonight’s finale against the visiting Red Sox. He threw 84 pitches into the 6th inning, gave up 2 hits, 3 walks, and a single run, and struck out 4 Boston batters. Montgomery held the Red Sox off until the 5th inning, when a 1-out walk moved to 2nd on a wild pitch and then scored on an RBI single.

Robertson came in to close out the 6th for Montgomery and sailed his way through the 7th, keeping the Red Sox to that lone run. Betances followed that up with a flawless 12-pitch 8th inning.

Like I said before, the Yankees had tied up the game, right in the bottom of the 5th. Headley hit a 1-out single and then easily scored on Austin Romine’s powerful triple. Up against the Red Sox’s ace pitcher, the Yankees always have a bit of trouble (as does every other team, if we’re being honest) trying to do much of anything. The Yankees racked up his pitch count, but he countered by getting the Yankee batters to strike out 12 times in just 7 innings.

So when the Red Sox’s ace starter finally left the game in the 7th, the Yankees saw their opportunity to make up for lost time. With 1 out in the 8th, the Yankees loaded up the bases with 2 walks and a single. Todd Frazier’s long sacrifice fly scored lead-runner Hicks to break the tie (and those winning odds skyrocketed, by the way). But with a new reliever on the mound, the next batter struck out in just 3 pitches.

And it was on to Aroldis Chapman for just 3 outs to hand the Yankees the win. He struck out the first batter in just 3 pitches (and 101+ mph fastballs that just stunned the veteran powerhitter). But the next batter, a young rookie on the roster, promptly sent a fastball into the visitor’s bullpen out in left-center field to tie up the game.

And the Yankees tried to make something happen in the bottom of the 9th to walk-off a win — a lead-off walk moved to 2nd on a sacrifice bunt and then to 3rd on a ground out, but the Yankees left him stranded there. Chapman continued into the 10th inning, getting a lead-off strikeout, but then hitting a batter and walking the next.

Tommy Kahnle walked the next batter to load up the bases, and then gave up a single so the Red Sox could score the winning run before Kahnle pitched through the next 2 batters with the bases loaded. Once again, all the Yankees needed was to catch up and retake the lead in the bottom of the inning. But oddly, the Red Sox closer (who normally struggles against the Yankees this season) was on point and breezed through the necessary 3 outs to advance the Red Sox’s lead in the AL East.

Final score: 3-2 Red Sox, in 10 innings, Red Sox win series 2-1.

Scranton Shuttle: the Yankees optioned reliever Giovanni Gallegos back to AAA Scranton and recalled reliever Caleb Smith for a fresh arm in the bullpen.

Yes, the Yankees are now 5 1/2 games behind the Red Sox in the AL East. We are solidly in the Wild Card race, leading the Angels by 1 1/2 games. But we are winding down the series and there are just 46 games left in the Yankees’ season. Even so, there’s still time for many things to happen, especially as the Yankees will face the Red Sox again next month.

And in more fun news: today marked the anniversary of Aaron Judge’s debut as a Yankee. Yes, exactly one year ago today, #99 began his legacy in the Bronx. A legacy that certainly kind of faltered a bit by the end of last season, but then became something to talk about beginning in Spring Training of this year. He’s had similar struggles as last season in this post All-Star break, but there’s no reason to think he’s stuck there permanently.

Because it’s Judge — the kid who won the Home Run Derby and hit home run balls well over 500 feet, who hasn’t faltered in the outfield at all and is known for his quick and strong arm, who still (despite his struggles this year) is still very much in contention for rookie of the year (and deserves it in my opinion), and who really could be the first retired #99 in Monument Park and Cooperstown in like 25 years.

Go Yankees!

Game 112: NYY vs. TOR — It was close, until it wasn’t

Masahiro Tanaka got the start for the middle game of this mid-week series in Toronto. He had a bit of a struggle tonight, throwing 88 pitches into the 5th inning, giving up just 2 hits, but 5 walks, and 3 runs (just 2 earned), striking out just 2 Toronto batters.

In the 2nd, with 2 runners in scoring position, a ground out scored the Blue Jays’ first run. A fielder’s choice got the other runner coming home in a wild rundown play with far too many throws, just a standard 5-2-6-2-6-1 play. The lead-off batter in the 3rd reached on catcher’s interference (and it wasn’t Ellsbury!), but then Tanaka quickly loaded the bases with 2 walks. A sacrifice fly scored the only run as they worked their way out of the inning without further damage. After a lead-off home run and a walk in the 5th, Tanaka’s night was over.

He handed the ball off to Chad Green, who promptly ended the 5th with 3 consecutive strikeouts. But then Green got into trouble of his own in the 6th. With 1 out and a runner on 1st, a double scored another run for the Blue Jays, and it was on to Tommy Kahnle for relief. A wild pitch moved the runner to 3rd, and after a walk and out, a single scored yet another Toronto run.

But that would be it for the Blue Jays as the back-end of the bullpen came in with great momentum. Robertson and Betances just sailed through the 7th and 8th innings, and Warren, despite allowing 2 baserunners, got out of the 9th unscathed.

Meanwhile, it seemed like quite the cat-and-mouse game. After the Yankees, who got on the board first, would score, the Blue Jays would come back and grab a few of their own runs. But then the Yankees got to the point where their offense was uncatchable and their relievers were too strong for the Blue Jays to catch-up completely.

To lead off the 2nd inning, Gary Sanchez and Todd Frazier hit consecutive solo home runs to start tonight’s run-scoring. Then Didi Gregorius got in on the game with a 2-out solo home run of his own in the 3rd. In the 5th, with 2 outs, Judge and Gregorius were in scoring position and the starter handed over the ball to the bullpen. Todd Frazier’s double scored both runners, and Jacoby Ellsbury followed that up with a double of his own to score Frazier.

They jumped on the Blue Jays’ bullpen and their less-than-stellar outing tonight. In the 8th, Frazier led-off with a single, and the Blue Jays changed pitchers. After a strikeout, they changed pitchers again. Garret Cooper (who ended up with a 4-hit night, by the way) doubled, and Ronald Torreyes’ single scored both runners {Note: no media link, sorry}.

Finally, in the 9th, the Yankees loaded up the bases after Gregorius and Sanchez singled and Frazier was hit by a pitch. All the runners moved up on Jacoby Ellsbury’s ground outground out, so Gregorius scored. Cooper’s single then scored both Sanchez and Frazier to cap off the Yankees’ big night of scoring.

The Yankees’ roster was heavy on the offense tonight, with 17 total hits. Every starter got on base, most with hits, most with multiple hits. It was just a big show of Yankee power.

Final score: 11-5 Yankees

Injury news: so last night, CC Sabathia only threw 3 innings because in the 3rd, he kind of tweaked his knee, the same knee he’s had trouble with in the past. Despite today’s MRI showing no new damage, knee injuries are difficult to diagnose and treat. Sabathia is confident he won’t have to go on the DL or miss his next start. As someone who also has a lingering knee issue, I hope he is able to deal with this without much drama or lingering pain.

Clint Frazier was out of tonight’s game due to a tightness in his oblique. It was a last-minute change, just 40 minutes before the game. Hopefully, this is just a short-lived injury. But there is talks that Aaron Hicks is close to being activated. His rehab stints are going well, and he was recently transferred to be with AA Trenton. There is talk that Hicks will be back on Friday, when the Yankees return to the Bronx to host the Red Sox for the weekend.

In the interim, the Yankees close out their North of the Border series tomorrow night, helmed by Sonny Gray, hoping to have a better outing than his last time on the mound for the Yankees. Fingers crossed that the Yankees can head home with a series win this time.

Go Yankees!

Game 108: NYY vs. CLE — Bumpy start ends in continued slump (but the Lake & rivers are clean…er)

Based on how tonight’s game panned out, I think the city of Cleveland is seeking revenge for calling them the “Mistake on the Lake” in yesterday’s post. (More below after the game recap.) To be perfectly fair and reveal some full disclosure, my mom’s family grew up in Northeast Ohio, and they always called the city that. (Literally, I only here that phrase in my mother’s voice. Thanks, Mom!)

They also grew up diehard Indians’ fans, still waiting for their next World Series win, most of them not even alive the last time Cleveland won (1948). This makes this series a whole lot more interesting personally, making the one thing both sides of this have in common is that we both root against the Red Sox. (Though I’m still a little murky as to why the Indians think of the Red Sox as a valid rivalry.)

Anyway, the Yankees called on their other newly acquired starter Jaime Garcia. This ended up being Garcia’s third straight start with three different teams — July 21 with the Braves, July 28 with the Twins, and tonight with the Yankees. But Garcia got roughed up in this particular team debut. He threw 87 pitches into the 5th inning, gave up 5 hits, 4 walks, and 6 runs (only 5 earned), and struck out just 4 Cleveland batters.

In the 2nd, with 2 outs, Garcia gave up a walk and then scored on a double. The runner ended up at 3rd on the throw and then scored on a passed ball. Despite giving up a walk and a single to load up the bases, Garcia got out of the inning with a line out to Gregorius. In the 3rd, a lead-off single scored on another single and throwing error. The base runner ended up at 2nd on that play, moved to 3rd on a ground out, and then scored on a sacrifice fly.

Garcia just couldn’t find the momentum to get through these innings. In the 5th, a 1-out walk stole 2nd and then scored on a single. Then that runner moved to 2nd on a wild pitch, and ended up at 3rd on a ground out. That would be it for Garcia.

It was on to Chad Green, whose wild pitch scored one more run for the Indians that inning before getting that 3rd out of the 5th. Green then breezed through the next 2 innings, tallying up 5 strikeouts himself. He then handed the game over to Tommy Kahnle for the 8th inning, who found his own trouble — a lead-off double scored on an RBI double to add the Indians’ final run of the night.

Meanwhile, the Yankees were hitting off the Indians’ pitchers tonight — racking up 11 total hits (more than the Indians’ offense got tonight), 7 off the starter alone. Those hits (and the 2 walks) just weren’t adding up to runs-scored. In fact, for most of the game, it felt like the Indians’ pitcher and defense were much more dominant tonight.

Then in the 5th, Todd Frazier hit a 1-out solo home run into the right field seats to get the Yankees on the board. The Yankees then loaded up the bases later in the inning, but a swinging strikeout ended that potential rally and stopped them in their tracks.

The Yankees got one more chance in the 9th inning. Despite a lead-off single that got erased in a double play, it would be Ronald Torreyes to kick off a potential moment of hope. He hit a solid single, moved to 2nd on defensive indifference, and then scored on Brett Gardner’s single. But a fielder’s choice ground out ended the inning and the game. Too little, too late.

Final score: 7-2 Indians

Okay, more on the nicknames… “The Mistake on the Lake.” Look, a lot of this points back to the late 1960s before much of current clean water restrictions were enacted and Lake Erie was so polluted and that fed into its major rivers. At one point, it was so bad that the Cuyahoga River (the main river through Cleveland) actually caught on fire in 1969. Fortunately, with the passing of the Clean Water Act three years later, the city was forced to clean up its waterways and the big lake on its north shore. But the reputation for being the city whose river once caught on fire stuck, especially with those from the area (or rather the suburbs around the area).

In its place, the city has tried to refocus attention on its biggest attraction — the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Thanks to the rise of the genre, and how many of its biggest stars were from the area, the natural connection to the city evolved over time only to be cemented by the Hall when they built it in 1983. Since then, I think most people think of this (or Drew Carey) when they think of Cleveland.

That is until last year. When Cleveland became “Believe-land” as both their biggest sports were the Cavaliers (basketball) and Indians (side burn: even my Cleveland-area family aren’t Browns fans, but that’s a completely different story). Both the Cavs and Indians went to their respective championships, all the way to Game 7. Only the Cavs came up as winners in the end, but it still made last year something for Clevelanders everywhere to be proud of that wasn’t music or pollution-related history.

On a personal note, due to family connections, I’ve spent quite a bit of time in Cleveland, and I’ve never been to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame or a Cavaliers game. No, growing up, we explored less nickname-worthy places. Like finding out their art museum has an Armor Court. And their historical society has an extensive antique car and aviation exhibit. And there’s a village stuck in the early 1800s, much like Colonial Williamsburg but 1820s rural Ohio.

Despite the deep roots here, this may actually explain why I’m a Yankees fan.

Go Yankees!

Game 106: DET vs. NYY — Super soggy in the Bronx leads to double delays

So, a game that was scheduled to start at 1:05 pm today ended up concluding about 8 hours later thanks to just continuous thunderstorms that swept through the area several times this afternoon and into the evening. Before the finale against the Tigers even started, the game was in rain delay. One hour and twenty-six minutes after the scheduled start, Masahiro Tanaka took the mound.

Overall, Tanaka actually had a pretty strong outing. He threw 100 pitches in his 6 innings, gave up 6 hits, a walk, and 2 runs (only 1 earned), and struck out 7 batters along the way. Tanaka had trouble in the 1st giving up consecutive singles to start the game. A double scored the first run before Tanaka zeroed in and got those 3 outs quickly. With 2 outs in the 4th, Tanaka gave up his lone allowed walk who then scored on a single and fielding error (the unearned run).

Tommy Kahnle got through the 7th inning in just 8 pitches, breezing his way through the Tigers’ roster. Tanaka’s fairly strong start and Kahnle’s speedy scoreless outing should have been enough that the Yankees’ offense could build something on it. But they didn’t do much on the 6 allowed hits from the Tigers’ starter.

And then it rained. Pretty hard, actually. So the game came to a screeching halt between the 7th and 8th innings. For 3 hours and 11 minutes. Rain delay #2. Tarp on the field, rain pouring down the dugout steps. It was so heavy at times that fans seated behind home plate could barely make out the Yankee Stadium sign over the left field seats.

So they waited it out. The groundscrew came out to test the field. Things seemed to look okay to finish the last 2 innings, so the game resumed at 8:30 pm. Yes, about 7 1/2 hours after the original scheduled start time. And for the handful of faithful fans, they got to see quite the treat as Dellin Betances came on and promptly threw a perfect 9-pitch, 3-strikeout inning, sending the game back to the Yankees’ offense.

Despite a lead-off walk, the Yankees had no such luck. So Betances tried again in the 9th, still keeping the Tigers from adding to their lead. And the Yankees tried again in the bottom of the 9th, facing a former teammate who just plowed right through them in just 8 pitches. The Yankees were shut out for just the second time this season.

Final score: 2-0 Tigers, Tigers win series 2-1.

Now, the Yankees are off to Cleveland for a 4-game weekend series. Actually, despite Cleveland leading in their division, they’re pretty much evenly matched with the Yankees. With these last 2 losses, the Yankees have dropped to a game behind Boston in the AL East.

Actually, looking at the standings right now, it’s still very much anyone’s game. At least in the American League. There’s quite a bit of a divide in the NL between the bottom teams and the top. But the AL is really tight in nearly every division, and especially for the Wild Card. With 56 game still left in the season, it’s really far too early to tell who’s going to be playing October baseball, and who’ll be watching it from their couch.

And doesn’t that make things a bit more interesting?

Go Yankees!

Game 104: DET vs. NYY — Yankees remain strong, last-minute trade grab

Today was the final day of the big MLB trade deadline, and even the Yankees benefited from some last-minute trade deals. But at the expense of some pretty great prospects. More after the game recap, as they still had to play a game in the Bronx.

The Yankees continued their home stand with this 3-game midweek series against the visiting Tigers. The Yankees are hoping to keep their winning momentum going with this new series, so it was only natural to look to Luis Severino to start tonight’s game. Severino threw 116 pitches in just 5 innings, gave up 4 hits, 3 walks, and a run, and still struck out 8 Detroit batters.

The still hashtag-less Severino had his toughest inning was the 4th. With 2 outs, he struggled to get that final out, giving up a single that scored on an RBI double. The Yankees’ defense also earned their 2 fielding errors that inning, though it ultimately didn’t affect the score. It just helped push up his pitch count, which was really the roughest part of his outing.

Tommy Kahnle came on in relief for the 6th inning and had a bit of his own struggles. His lead-off batter was hit by a pitch, moved to 2nd on a single, and then scored on a 2-out single to double the Tigers’ score.

Betances had better luck in the 7th, keeping the Tigers from adding to their score, and Jonathan Holder kept things smooth in the 8th. Holder’s 9th inning, however, wasn’t so smooth. With just 1 out on the board, Holder loaded up the bases with consecutive singles and a hit-by-pitch, before handing over the ball to Aroldis Chapman. A fielder’s choice (or rather a late effort at a double play) scored just one more run for the Tigers before a 3-pitch strikeout ended the Tigers’ last-minute rally.

Meanwhile, the Yankees took their opportunities when they found them. In the 4th, they loaded up the bases with a walk, a fielding error, and a walk. Chase Headley’s double scored 2 runs, and then Todd Frazier’s single scored 2 more. All before the Yankees got a single out that inning, and suddenly the Yankees leapt ahead of the Tigers.

Aaron Judge added an extra cushion to the lead with a 1-out solo home run in the 5th into the left field seats. In the 7th, lead-off batter Ellsbury was hit by a pitch, stole 2nd, and then scored on Clint Frazier’s giant triple. After Judge worked a walk, the Tigers pulled their starter and went to their bullpen. Gary Sanchez’s sacrifice fly scored Frazier for the final Yankees’ run of the night.

Final score: 7-3 Yankees.

Scranton Shuttle: before the game, for fresh arms in the bullpen, the Yankees optioned pitcher Luis Cessa to AAA Scranton and recalled Jonathan Holder, who ended up in tonight’s game.

Okay, the big trade of the day has the Yankees picking up a new pitcher for the starting rotation — Sonny Gray, a 27-year-old starter from the Athletics. In trade, the Yankees sent 3 of their prospects — outfielder Dustin Fowler, infielder Jorge Mateo, and pitcher James Kaprielian. Yes, Fowler and Kaprielian are on the DL recovering from surgeries, which should tell you how valuable both teams think of these players.

Sonny Gray was a first round draft pick in 2011 for the Athletics, after pitching at Vanderbilt. Gray came up in the A’s organization, making his MLB debut in 2013 and the 2015 All-Star team. He’s had a bit of a rough season last year on and off the DL, and another small one early this season. But he’s got the history of consistency and the youth that the Yankees really need for some potential long-term players.

The Yankees also picked up extra money for the international draft market (also called “Future Considerations”) on this trade. They picked up even more when they sent pitching prospect Yefry Ramirez to the Orioles. This is good for the Yankees as they continue to expand internationally and pick up more players in a broader market.

Go Yankees!

Game 98: CIN vs. NYY — The old “Jersey-Ohio Triple Play”

Back in the Bronx tonight, the Yankees hosted their first of two games against the visiting Reds for a short series. And they made sure it was a quick game (just 2 hours and 38 minutes) for the Yankees home debut of New Jersey native Todd Frazier against his former team. And they also made sure it was a quite memorable.

Jordan Montgomery got the start tonight and had a rather great outing tonight. He threw just 85 pitches into the 7th inning, giving up just 2 hits, a walk, and a run, striking out Cincinnati batters, and setting himself up for the win. That lone run was scored in the 6th when a lead-off double moved to 3rd on a ground out and then scored on another ground out.

Tommy Kahnle finished off the 7th inning in just 4 pitches, handing things over to Dellin Betances for the 8th. But Betances had some trouble with his strike zone tonight. With 2 outs, and after walking 2 batters, he gave up a double that scored the lead runner to double the Reds’ score. Adam Warren got out of the jam with a 7-pitch strike out. Aroldis Chapman breezed through the 9th with just 8 pitches, earning his 12th save of the season.

Meanwhile, the Yankees got on board in rather dramatic fashion thanks to New Jersey-born Todd Frazier. First, the Yankees loaded up the bases in the 2nd with consecutive singles to Holliday, Gregorius, and Headley. Things were looking up for the first at-bat as a Yankee for Frazier, but he hit a little grounder to the shortstop as Holliday came in to score the run. The Reds shortstop stepped on 2nd for out #1 and then fired it to 1st for a fairly standard double play (out #2 at 1st). But they caught Gregorius between 2nd and 3rd and got him in a rundown, between 3rd and the shortstop who started it all for out #3 of what became a triple play. Yes, that is a 6-6-3-3-5-6 for your scoring geeks. But I call it the “Jersey-Ohio Triple Play” (which is really-what?-Pennsylvania?).

Anyway, fortunately, the Yankees weren’t fazed by such a weird play and kept adding to their score bit-by-bit. In the 4th, Judge led-off with a single, moved to 2nd on a ground out, was sent to 3rd on a balk, and then scored on Gregorius’ sacrifice fly. With 1 out and Wade on 1st in the 5th, Wade scored on Austin Romine’s double. Later in that inning, the Yankees loaded up the bases with 2 outs, but a ground out ended that threat. For an insurance run, Didi Gregorius hit a big 2-out solo home run in the 8th to keep the Yankees in the lead and seal their victory tonight.

 

Final score: 4-2 Yankees.

Fun triple play trivia: Tonight’s play was the 3rd one this season, the first time a run scored safely during a triple play since May 2006 in all of MLB, and the Reds’ first one in over 22 years (May 12, 1995). The article linked above listed the Yankees’ last triple play as against the Rays on September 27, 2011. But that could be slightly misleading. To clarify, 2011 was the last time before tonight that the Yankees batting into a triple play, but they’ve certainly had a their share as fielders. I’ve covered two in my time on this blog — one against the Rays in April 2014 and another against the Orioles in 2013 (this is the fun one!).

Go Yankees!